Parenting Oklahoma

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Know It: Parenting Oklahoma includes articles, advice, information, links and blogs about all aspects of parenting in Oklahoma.

Number of single parents raising children continues rise

News | Updated: Tue, Jan 17, 2012

As a single mother, Lavonda Jones faces a struggle that is becoming increasingly common in Oklahoma and across the country. More than 168,600 single parents — nearly 122,700 of them women — are raising their children alone in Oklahoma, up nearly 19 percent in the past decade, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures. Nationally, married couples with children make up 20 percent of all households, compared with 40 percent in 1970. The rate of single-parent households led by black women is higher than that of other racial groups. Census data shows that in 2011, 3.68 million black children lived with both parents, while slightly more than 3.73 million black children lived in homes where never-married mothers were the head of households. Meanwhile, among whites, nearly 40 million children lived with both parents, while slightly more than 3.7 million lived with never-married mothers.

Jason Davey, left, won the diaper-changing contest for expectant dads at Integris Health Edmond during a “Babies, Bottles and Booties” event. Cory Reginger, right, was among the five men who competed. His winning time was 27 seconds. The next closest time was 31 seconds. Davey walked away with a $25 gift card from the Meat House in Edmond. PHOTOS BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN
Jason Davey, left, won the diaper-changing contest for expectant dads at Integris Health Edmond during a “Babies, Bottles and Booties” event. Cory Reginger, right, was among the five men who competed. His winning time was 27 seconds. The next closest time was 31 seconds. Davey walked away with a $25 gift card from the Meat House in Edmond. PHOTOS BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

Daddies-to-be test their skills in Edmond diaper-changing

News | Published: Tue, Apr 3, 2012

EDMOND — Jason Davey beat out four other soon-to-be dads during a diaper-changing contest. His winning time was 27 seconds. Next closest time was 31 seconds. Davey won a $25 gift card from the Meat House in Edmond. The dads were attending Integris Health Edmond's “Babies, Bottles and Booties” event that introduced expectant parents to the hospital's women's center. About 50 people attended the event.

Make necessary vaccinations less stressful for children

Updated: Wed, Jan 9, 2013

Vaccines help protect babies and young children against 14 serious diseases. Even though you are keeping her safe from diseases, it's hard to see your child cry when she gets her shots. But you can take some steps before, during and after a vaccine visit to ease the pain and stress of getting shots. Read about the shots your child will get in advance. Bring your child's vaccine record to show the doctor. Pack a favorite toy, book, blanket or other comfort item. For older children, be honest -- shots can pinch or sting, but not for long. Remind them that shots help keep them healthy. Ask your child's doctor any questions you have about vaccines.

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Oklahoman Articles

Correction: Film-Chalamet and Carell story
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Read the transcript of AP's interview with President Trump
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